Vegepod – raised garden beds

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Vegepod

Coooooooweeeeeeee!!

No missing the arrival of Simon from Vegepod! He dropped in to our garden for a visit all the way from Sydney. Under his arm he carried a large box that contained a Vegepod that was going to be installed in our garden. We were blown away at the thought of having such a cool veggie growing system in our garden as we had been admiring them for quite some time.

So what is ‘VEGEPOD?’

Container gardening in an easy to manage contained gardening bed that controls your growth and veggie quality in a separate environment away from the ground.

A self watering system to allow veggie health is ensured with a self-watering technology by using a wicking system and watering the plants from below. Plants can last weeks without watering in Vegepods.

A protective cover of polyethylene knitted mesh protects crops from UV and pests. The cover also helps manage temperature by allowing water and air to penetrate.

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VEGEPOD

The pods are garden beds raised off the ground which will prove a perfect solution for some of our special needs kids as they can now easily reach & see the gardens contents. Teaching kids the importance of where food comes from is a high priority of Vegepod’s and ours too. With a self watering system in place, like that of a wicking bed, we are really keen to see how much water can be saved and time spent watering. Not only time and water saving but the canopy will also help to protect the growing contents from all sorts of common garden pests and be a bit of fun for the kids to be able to grow food in something a little different to our usual timber frame ground beds.

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setting up

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setting up

Setting up the pod looked fairly simple………although we were pretty happy to have Simon take hold of the ropes and get the kids involved in the set up so they could gain an understanding of how the system worked. He rounded up all the kids that were scattered in the garden and got them to work putting the Vegepod together. Simon’s larrikin nature kept them entertained making the process fun and entertaining. We tried to concentrate on a workshop we were running with the community but it was hard not get involved in the set up of the pod and join in the fun. The kids were laughter was infectious as they  screwed bolts, connected walls, inserted drip systems and built a canopy.

Simon asked us a favour… ‘can you film me in the vegepod wearing my pj’s?’ ‘WHAT?’ next thing we know he is in his pyjamas, jumped in the pod and  we are putting together a little Instagram video for his followers. Dare completed! seems Simon cannot pass up a good dare by one of his followers. Stomachs hurting from all the laughter and shinanigans we all thought he was the best and can’t wait for him to come back, especially the kids!

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final touches

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setting up

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fun times

Nature crowns were being made in a workshop so we crowned Simon the Vegepod King and grabbed a photo. Conversations about the garden flowed throughout the day with the story of how the grounds once looked 3 years ago. When we tell our story out loud we realize just how much we have achieved. He was amazed at what he saw as he entered the garden and knew that having us on his radar had been a good idea! “It’s probably the best school plot I’ve seen”.

We look forward to getting the Vegepod  full of produce and will let the kids decide on what to plant so they can take ownership of the system and compare it to that of our regular raised garden beds.

The depth of the pods for growing are 30cm which is ideal for carrots and all the long rooted veggies. If you pop over to VEGEPOD social media you can see many varieties of vegetables and herbs growing. Our new pod is a large size and consists of 4 beds with a canopy and a stand. Each bed takes about 5 bags of good quality potting mix, ours will use 1/2 cubic metre which will get delivered. Finding the right location will take a bit of thought as we need to make sure it is accessable to everyone and in the right sun conditions and once filled will be quite heavy so we need to get the position right, although it is moveable.

Definitely worth a go if you have little space (they come in small size) or you are a little unsure about growing your own food. Kids will happily take ownership and get involved.

For more info about head over to their website for all the info.

and…… make sure you visit their social media to see the video we made.
10/4 See you soon Simon, and thanks Vegepod!

 

Life lessons with the Vegepod

In modern life, it’s easy to become disconnected from the planet, especially the source of our food, which most often comes from a supermarket. But when children see vegetables growing in a Vegepod in their own garden, they will understand where food comes from and develop a closer connection to the earth.

Also, they will see that, with the right techniques, food can be grown sustainably in the home and cultivated as a renewable resource, instead of something that is instantly available at the market.

This is hugely important for young people to learn – the coming generations are facing huge environmental challenges through rising populations, climate change and pollution.

By showing them a small change – growing your own food in the home – you can positively influence the way they live the rest of their lives, consciously choosing better alternatives for food and living.

www.vegepod.com.au

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2 thoughts on “Vegepod – raised garden beds

    • Growing Green Thumbs says:

      vegepod is a winner! we love ours, although it did take a little while for us to get it growing.. i suppose we were just used to the usual garden beds and their ease of maintenance, but now we know how to control the water level ours has come along nicely 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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